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Lauren Rowles, GMN
By Lauren Rowles | Dec 20, 2018
GMN's holiday calendar 2019

As part of our yearly tradition, GMN has produced another custom calendar for the upcoming year. Apart from the functional value offered in helping to track the months and days of the year, these calendars also serve as a fun way to show off some of GMN’s decorative capabilities. In collaboration with our Seattle, WA Division, this year’s calendars were created at GMN’s Monroe, NC Division.

This year, we decided to make some exciting modifications to our calendar design, while still maintaining some of the same design elements as in previous years.

On the top strip of the calendar, there is an overlap spin pattern. This finish has been included on some calendars in years past, however, this year we enhanced the spin finish by taking the spin and dragging it along the metal surface, creating a dynamic look that reflects light in an interesting way. While this capability may seem common, the challenge that was posed by this application was achieving the drag spin at an angle and selectively. In order to contain the drag spin finish to only the top area, the process required laying down a resist layer over the desired area before the drag spin was applied. This resist layer protects the bright and other areas of the metal on which we didn’t want the spin to be applied. However, the resist ink can be difficult to work with at times, as it needs to be strong enough to withstand the drag spin, but gentle enough so that it can be removed after the spin is applied.

In addition, to complement and enrich the movement of the drag spin finish, a carbon fiber design was printed on the background of the calendar. Achieving the right balance of color was critical for printing this pattern because the color needed to have enough contrast to be visible but also be light enough to allow for the aluminum material to show through. Lithographic printing was used to print the months of the year onto the metal and create the halftone gradient pattern that is featured. Lastly, the GMN and logo and the year were embossed to add extra dimension and value to the calendar overall.

The entire GMN team is proud of the final product and is excited for it to take us into the new year!

By Chris Doyle | Feb 13, 2018
This component was made using 3D electroform

If you’re interested in adding a new and stylish look to your nameplate or component, you may want to consider 3D electroform. Using this process, you can achieve many different intricate looks and design elements on one part. You can create contrast within the nameplate by using an array of textures, depths, and colors. In this blog we will use the Callaway Golf component as an example to highlight different techniques and elements you can achieve with 3D electroform.

In short, 3D electroforming is a process of chrome and nickel plating that forms in a steel mold. The process begins with making a custom tool, using a CNC milling machine to cut out the mold in a block of steel. During this step, textures, finishes, and other desired decorative elements are added within the tooling, creating a unique look for the finished parts. The tool is then dipped into a nickel bath with an electrical current running through it which causes the nickel to start building up on the mold. Then the mold is taken out and washed with water. Next, that mold is dipped into a second tank, a chrome bath, also with an electrical current running through it, to build up a thin layer of chrome around the mold as well. This thin layer of chrome gives the part a high cosmetic finish. Finally, the mold is taken out and cleaned to prepare it for painting or any other decorative elements that will be added.

Spin finish

There are several different finishes and decorative options available with 3D electroform. On the raised silver “V” shape of the Callaway component, you can see a spin finish was applied. Spin finishes are many lines moving in a perfect circle pattern, which can create a specific focal point on the component. Selective spin finishes can be applied so specified regions of the part reflect light in an appealing way.

Brush finish

On the silver streak running horizontally along the Callaway component, you can see a brushed finish was applied. Brush finishes are lines moving in the same parallel direction creating a consistent blanket of lines. They can also be added to selective areas of the component, and can vary from fine to heavy thicknesses.

You can make intricate patterns with 3D electroform

Many different patterns can be created using 3D electorm, and they can be used to achieve unique backgrounds and textures. An example of this can be seen in the black background of the Callaway component, with its deep crisscross pattern.

There is a wide variety of painting and coloring options for 3D electroform parts, which are added after the part is plated. In this component, we see a red gloss, black gloss and matte black applied to the component.

One thing to consider while using 3D electroform is the draft angle. The draft angle means it is difficult to create parts that have 90° perpendicular design elements in them, so they must be changed to greater than 90°. This is required because after a nameplate or component has been formed in the different liquid baths, you must remove it from the tool, and 90° elements are difficult to remove. Some features, like the large “V” of the component, can require 15-20° draft. But once you have this rule in mind, you can create almost any shape or pattern with different finishes and depths all in one nameplate, as it is formed from a machined tool.

The different depths created with 3D electroform is what makes these components stand out compared to nameplates made with embossing and forming tools, which have limitations on how much material can be formed. 3D electroforming also saves time and money by forming multiple finishes and raised areas in one process.

To learn more about this process, read our blog on 3D electroform nameplates for distinct & detailed branding.

 Many decoration options are possible with 3D Electroform

Lauren Rowles, GMN
By Lauren Rowles | Dec 12, 2016
GMN's custom calendar for 2017.

With 2017 rapidly approaching, GM Nameplate has continued its tradition of creating custom calendars for the new year. In addition to functioning as a unique calendar, this part demonstrates a variety of GMN capabilities. This calendar was designed and produced through the collaboration of our Seattle, WA and China divisions. Made of aluminum, the metal calendar utilizes a mixture of mechanical finishes, colored ink, printed graphics, and 2D electroform.

The top strip of the calendar was created using a printed spin circle design. The pattern is intriguing because even though it was printed on to the strip, it resembles a selective spin finish on metal. The design adds movement and aesthetic appeal to the part. 2D electroform was also used on the top strip to highlight the company logo and “2017.”

The bottom area of the calendar showcases a vertically brushed selective finish. A dark grey color was applied to the bottom area as well, which helped make the top strip design stand out. Achieving the perfect level of transparency for the grey colored ink was challenging because the tint needed to be light enough for the brush finish to show through, but still dark enough to create the desired contrast. After rounds of testing, the team reached a balance that satisfied both needs. Lastly, the aluminum was embossed around the edges of each month to add texture to the calendar.

The GMN team is proud to present this sleek and interesting calendar to start off 2017.