plastic decorating series

Key Word Search

Filter by Category

Popular tags

3M
ECG
EMI
EP
GMN
GMP
IMD
IQ
ISO
LED
NC
OCA
OQ
PQ
RBH
Tag
VHB
Chris Passanante, GMN
By Chris Passanante | Apr 25, 2017
Plastic insert mold decorated part for the automotive industry.

In the sixth and final part of our blog series covering plastic decoration capabilities, insert mold decorating will be discussed.

Insert mold decorating, known as IMD, is a technology that imbeds a graphic overlay into an injection molded plastic piece. The IMD machine first picks up the graphic overlay with a robotic arm and then loads it into the mold. Molten resin is then injected into the mold which bonds the overlay to the part. From there, the robotic arm picks up the complete part and sets it onto the conveyer belt to be sent to the operator.

IMD is a high volume application using automated processes. In terms of functionality, this technology is utilized frequently for the aerospace and automotive industries because the process ensures strong durability and that the ink won’t wear off of the part. There are material considerations for bonding to ensure that different materials will adhere correctly. For example, if you are bonding two different materials such as nylon and polycarbonate that don’t want to stick together, it can be challenging to figure out how to bond them together. This can be done on first or second surfaces, meaning placing the graphic overlay either on top or below the plastic, and is a design driven decision.

In addition, IMD parts are bulletproof, which is an important feature for many ruggedized industries. Aesthetically, IMD can pull off multiple effects including wood grain, carbon fiber, and high gloss piano black, which are frequently used in the automotive industry. IMD can also incorporate backlighting technologies. Backlighting can be molded in and bonded into the part versus the use of adhesives.

The development phase for IMD can be long, but prototyping can be very helpful for the design as a production tool. IMD is an advanced process through which many GMN customers have found long lasting results. 

To learn more about the plastic decorative options offered at GMN, please visit the rest of our blog series by clicking here

Chris Passanante, GMN
By Chris Passanante | Mar 27, 2017

In part five of our plastic decorating series, we will discuss painting and laser etching. Painting is another standard plastic decorating option and is widely utilized across different industries. Painting employs multiple process methods including robotic painting and hand spray painting. The differentiator between these two options is the program volume. High volume production shifts towards automatic processes while lower volumes lean towards manual painting.

There are many benefits of painting. First, painting can achieve highly specific colors that are crucial for customers’ branding. Next, painting allows for multiple colors to be applied to a part. This process also has the ability to hide mold flow lines, knit lines and other molding imperfections that are sometimes inevitable in production. Additionally, painting can offer a textured effect with soft touch paint that provides a rubber feel, clear coat, or protective coating depending on program requirements.

As a decorative option, painting can be costly and masking can be labor intensive depending on the part. Painting requires a clean environment and sometimes the curing time is longer than for other decorative technologies.

Oftentimes, painting processes are used in collaboration with laser etching. Laser etching is a technology that uses a laser to burn away the paint in specified areas on a part. Laser etching can achieve very fine detail and can be utilized on multiple materials including silicone, hard thermoplastics, as well as metal. Along with removing paint, laser etching can permanently engrave and etch plastic. One aspect of production is to optimize cycle time by fixturing multiple parts at once during laser etching.

It is important to consider that with laser etching, the initial programming can be timely and the masking needed is labor intensive throughout the process.

Rubber keypads are a good example of the collaboration between painting and laser etching that has been utilized for years. This combination of technologies is also very popular in the automotive industry, especially in gear shift indicators, and it’s likely that these processes were utilized on a plastic piece within your vehicle.

In our final plastic decorating article, we will discuss insert mold decorating.

To learn more about the plastic decorative options offered at GMN, please visit the rest of our blog series by clicking here

Chris Passanante, GMN
By Chris Passanante | Feb 16, 2017
Vacuum metallized plastic part.

In this fourth part of our plastic decorating series, we will take a look at vacuum metallization. Vacuum metallization is a unique decorating technology that bonds a metallic layer to the plastic substrate through a vacuum vapor deposition process. This capability has both functional and decorative uses, such as EMI/RFI shielding or providing a chrome metallic finish.

Vacuum metallization is applied to the back side of a clear plastic part, but it appears to be chrome on the front side (looking through the clear material). This approach has allowed GMN to provide customers with some unique looking parts due to the 3-dimensional floating effect it that can be achieved with the right design inputs.  In some instances, we combine printing techniques and debossed lettering or images on the backside of the part and then vacuum metallize it for an additional effect.

At GMN, our team of plastic experts can include translucent backlighting on vacuum metallized parts to achieve a dead-front effect. This means that graphics or an LCD display will show through the chrome when the part is backlit, but will disappear behind the chrome when the lighting is turned off. 

Some considerations for this capability are that vacuum metallized parts can pick up fingerprints easily and depending on the detail of the part, the process of masking can be labor intensive. Overall, vacuum metallization is a bit more costly than other decorative options, but it achieves a very distinct and unique look that will allow your product to stand out from the competition.

Next, we’ll discuss the dual technologies of painting and laser etching plastic components.

Check out other blogs from this series to learn about more plastic decorative options:

Chris Passanante, GMN
By Chris Passanante | Dec 6, 2016
This plastic part was decorated using hot stamping.

In part three of our plastic decorating series, we will discuss hot stamping. This is a mature technology that continues to produce high quality parts year after year. Hot stamping utilizes heat and pressure to transfer predried ink or foil from a roll of film to a plastic part. The process is achieved by running the foil between the hot stamping die, then heating the die, and finally pressing the die down to apply the foil to the part. The decorative foil will only be applied to whichever part of the plastic is raised the highest.

Through hot stamping, a two-color, two-tone part can be decorated without having to do the time-consuming tasks of masking or painting. Another benefit of this process is that the ink doesn’t need to cure. Since the foil is transferred to the plastic part via heat, there is no need to run it through an oven afterwards. Intricate details can be achieved through this process as well. However, due to machine limitations there are restrictions on size.

This is an optimal technology for achieving metallic colors, and the shiny ink tones produced are unique within plastic decorating. In addition, the foil applied during hot stamping is durable and can withstand harsh environmental conditions.  

In our next article, we’ll explore the unique technology of vacuum metallization. 

Check out other blogs from this series to learn about more plastic decorative options:

Chris Passanante, GMN
By Chris Passanante | Nov 15, 2016
Screen printing is a popular plastic decorative option for achieving large graphics.

With multiple plastic decorative options available, it can be tricky identifying the correct solution for your program. Throughout this blog series, we will discuss different plastic decorating capabilities and the considerations of each. Today we’ll look at screen printing in particular.

In the first article of this series, “Plastic decorating: pad printing” we discussed pad printing. While pad printing is limited to smaller sizes of artwork, screen printing excels in larger coverages of ink for bigger graphics. This printing technology applies ink to the plastic part through mesh material. During the screen fabrication emulsion process, the pitch of the screen determines where the ink is applied. Screen printing is a good choice for high volume production programs and has the ability to decorate multiple parts at the exact same time. Additionally, there is a shorter set-up time associated with screen printing compared to other decorative options. For best results, flat surfaces are ideal for the screen printing process as well.

Because screen printing is optimal for large swatches of graphics, achieving the details of fine artwork can be challenging. A longer curing time can be associated with this process as well, especially if conventional drying inks are used without a UV system. Despite these challenges, screen printing is a popular technology that has successfully met many program requirements.

Our next decorative technology, hot stamping, provides the ability to achieve metallic colors.

Check out other blogs from this series to learn about more plastic decorative options:

Denys Sanftleben, GMN
By Denys Sanftleben | Jun 29, 2016
Pad printing at Elite Plastics

At GMN Plastics, we go beyond the standard injection and compression molding processes to offer full solutions to our customers through secondary processes. Within these secondary processes, we offer a range of plastic decorating capabilities in-house in our Beaverton, Oregon facility. These decorative technologies include pad printing, screen printing, hot stamping, vacuum metallization, painting and laser etching, and insert mold decorating.

One of the standard decorative technologies at GMN Plastics is pad printing. Through this printing process, ink is transferred from the cliché and is applied to the part via the pad. To do this, the artwork is etched onto the cliché, a flat plate, and ink is deposited into the grooves of the image. From there, the pad comes down on the cliché and picks up the image before transferring it to the part. At GMN Plastics, there are two types of pad printing machines including a programmable micro printer and standard pad printers. The difference between the two types is that the standard machine is equipped with stationary fixtures while the programmable printer is able to move the fixture so that the part can be printed on at multiple angles. Another major strength of pad printing compared to other decorative processes is the ability to print multiple colors during one set-up rather than through individual set-ups per color. This saves crucial time and money for the program. Pad printing is able to achieve fine print graphics as well.

Considerations when evaluating pad printing as a decorative option include the type of plastic material and the size of the artwork. If the plastic material being printed on has a heavy textured finish, the ink may not print as crisply or thoroughly as it would on a smooth material. Some plastic materials aren’t cohesive with inks and require a pre-treatment to ensure good adhesion. After production, a post-treatment is done to ensure that the ink is cured quickly. Despite these considerations, pad printing technology is highly recommended for its ability to achieve multiple colors and angles in one run.

In our next article we will discuss screen printing technology and its application for plastic parts.