emulsion process

Key Word Search

Filter by Category

Popular tags

3M
ECG
EMI
EP
GMN
GMP
IMD
IQ
ISO
LED
NC
OCA
OQ
PQ
RBH
Tag
VHB
Chris Passanante, GMN
By Chris Passanante | Nov 15, 2016
Screen printing is a popular plastic decorative option for achieving large graphics.

With multiple plastic decorative options available, it can be tricky identifying the correct solution for your program. Throughout this blog series, we will discuss different plastic decorating capabilities and the considerations of each. Today we’ll look at screen printing in particular.

In the first article of this series, “Plastic decorating: pad printing” we discussed pad printing. While pad printing is limited to smaller sizes of artwork, screen printing excels in larger coverages of ink for bigger graphics. This printing technology applies ink to the plastic part through mesh material. During the screen fabrication emulsion process, the pitch of the screen determines where the ink is applied. Screen printing is a good choice for high volume production programs and has the ability to decorate multiple parts at the exact same time. Additionally, there is a shorter set-up time associated with screen printing compared to other decorative options. For best results, flat surfaces are ideal for the screen printing process as well.

Because screen printing is optimal for large swatches of graphics, achieving the details of fine artwork can be challenging. A longer curing time can be associated with this process as well, especially if conventional drying inks are used without a UV system. Despite these challenges, screen printing is a popular technology that has successfully met many program requirements.

Our next decorative technology, hot stamping, provides the ability to achieve metallic colors.

Check out other blogs from this series to learn about more plastic decorative options: